Category Archives: Indian Stories

Jun
27
  • Two Trails – The Indian Side Of The Story

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    Two Trails – The Indian Side of the Story by Willie George (as told to Jack F. Contor) Author’s Note: It is a great thrill to visit the sites of old Indian campgrounds and battlefields, to find an arrowhead or some other object fashioned ages ago. Such an experience immediately sets one to wondering, “Who were these people? What were they like as individuals? Who made this arrowhead? Was he an old man? A young man just setting out on [...]

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Oct
29
  • Lords Of The South Plains

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    Lords Of The South Plains By Norman B Wiltsey “I would rather stay out on the plains and eat dung than live on the white man’s reservation”   Early in the 18th century, far-ranging French explorers encountered on the Great Plains a tribe of Indians called the Padoucas.  Moving south and fighting the native Indians as they went, the Padoucas became known as the Comanches — a Ute appellation meaning Enemy. Originally the Utes also applied the term to the [...]

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Apr
24
  • Sequoyah

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    Sequoyah By Ben T. Traywick “The giant redwoods of California bear this remarkable halfbreed Indian’s name, for he was a giant among men.”   One of the most famous Indians in the history of America was the half-breed Cherokee, Sequoyah, a man of outstanding courage and intelligence. He was born at about the same time that a few white settlers moved into the valleys of Wataugs. History does not record the exact date. His mother was the niece of a [...]

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Apr
23
  • Tecumseh and the Indian Nation

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    Tecumseh and the Indian Nation By Tony Hunter “Chiksika then showed Tecumseh how to master his inner self, to face danger without fear, bear pain without expression, loss without depression and triumph without boastfulness.” The life of the Indian Chief Tecumseh is really the story of great conflict between two men: the red man Tecumseh and the white man William Henry Harrison.  These two men could not have been more different.  The red man worked tirelessly for the benefit o [...]

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Apr
23
  • The Arrows That Wounded The West

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    The Arrows That Wounded The West By H. Henrietta Stockel “Used by most American Indians, bows and arrows made their mark on the frontier even when guns were abound, and arrowhead wounds kept Army surgeons plenty busy.”   IT’S A SIMPLE and obvious truth that American military men and women no long go off to war fearing fatal injuries from bows and arrows. These days, once-deadly arrowheads have become popular collector’s items. But no so long ago, soldiers in the [...]

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Apr
23
  • Yellow Wolf, loner in the Nez Perce War

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    Yellow Wolf, loner in the Nez Perce War By David M. Ballard “Tragedy was written in every lineament of his face, his laughter was infrequent, and  was never more than a soft, scarcely audible chuckle.”   IT WAS EVENING and autumn darkness was settling on the home of Lucullus McWhorter in North Yakima, Washington.  McWhorter was known as a friend of the Indians.  An Indian was leading a horse to the house. “Sick!”—Hoss stay here?” the Indian asked.  In the [...]

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Apr
23
  • Ambush!

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    Ambush! By Mathias Fisch “All but cowards follow me!”  The captain shouted.  And they did.  Half of them followed him to the grave.” They were young men, mostly farm boys from Fillmore County in southeastern Minnesota. Now they were soldiers, “volunteers” by request of President Lincoln, Company B of the Minnesota Fifth Regiment, garrisoned at Fort Ridgely. Activities at the fort were routine that hot, humid morning of August 18, 1862. Then J.C. Dickerson, storekeeper at the lower of the [...]

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Apr
23
  • The Gunnison Massacre

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    The Gunnison Massacre By Madoline C. Dixon “They felt they were justified in the killings because of the treatment  some of them had received from emigrants going through Utah Territory.” The series  of altercations between Ute Indians and whites that took place in the Utah of 1853 has become as the Walker War. Led by the cunning Walkara, or “Walker,” the Utes raided raided a number of Mormon settlements that year, mostly without success. The Gunnison Massacre in central Utah [...]

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Apr
22
  • Fertility Rites of the Mandans

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    Savage Fertility Rites of the Mandans By Colin Taylor “To ensure an abundance of buffalo and general good fortune, tradition dictated that the O-kee-pa should be given each summer.” The Mandans were a Siouan speaking group who, at the time of their earliest contact with Europeans, resided in circular earth lodge villages which were situated on the banks of the Missouri River in what is now the state of North Dakota. They referred to themselves as Numangkake (men) identifying their [...]

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Apr
22
  • Tonkawas – Man-eaters of the Texas Plains

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    Tonkawas – Man-eaters of the Texas Plains by Richard Stickman — Photos by the Smithsonian Institute National Anthropological Archives “Some historians believe that animosity toward the Tonkawas caused that tribe to act as scouts and guides for the whites…” The Tonkawa Indians were a small tribe who once claimed part of south-eastern Texas as their home. By 1862 their tiny population was erecting grass-thatched huts and teepees along the high plateau which overlooked the valley of the Washita River. Five [...]

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